Digital Hybrid Lab Week #9 Blog

After completing the collaborative project with Roger’s junior high kids, I was very intrigued by what Roger had to say, and his reasoning for many things. Going into this project, high hopes and achievable objectives were set, but sadly the project was not executed by all students in a way that would’ve been hoped for. Our conversation with Roger was very enlightening, regarding the issues that took place with many of his students, and how he was handling them. At the end of the day, I know for my group, according to Roger’s rubric, all the requirements were not “completed;” with that said, this was a valuable project for me because I learned so much about a digital platform that I was not acquainted with. Personally, my end goal was not completion, but more progress. I had a desire and interest to learn everything I could about Ableton, knowing I wouldn’t be a master at it, but would have exposure to the program. I tie this back in to what Roger was saying, because a core issue that he observed and we discussed was the lack of drive students had to tackle a fun collaborative project. Schooling and education in general is a place where kids should be able to creatively explore and express themselves. In other words, their is a desire to increase their knowledge because curiosity stems at the base of their roots. This is something that can be hard to try and implement into someone’s mentally, especially if that drive is not instilled in someone from the onset. Nevertheless, I think how Roger approached the situation was something similar that I would do, in which I would shove learning down anyones throat. I believe education is a privilege that many people, including myself have taken for granted. Therefore, my own personal philosophy on the matter is we can provide students with all the tools and knowledge to thrive and learn, but it is truly up to with that they will do with it.

Whitney

Digital Hybrid Lab Week #8 Blog

After completely the DAW project, my group has switched over to the Audio Interface Project in the Build Your Chops station. I am very excited for this rotation, because I feel like this project is especially applicable to my future as a music educator. One of the things that we are required to learn and master is wrapping xlr cords correctly. I can remember back in high school with my a cappella group, we would use handheld microphones, all with long cords attached. Every day after rehearsal it was an absolute tedious process to wrap the long cords, use the twisty ties to secure them, and disassemble everything else. We were told that we needed to take cautious care of the expensive equipment, but never was informed on how to properly wrap the cords, place them properly together, etc. I found this article posted in a blog by “The Black and Blue,” who broke down not only how to properly take care of equipment, but WHY. The three main reasons that they touched and elaborated on were safety, speed, and storage; the safety of coiling vs not coiling, the pros of wrapping them securely and properly, and the ease that it will be to store the cords back to together after using them. This article, along with the project, are tools so beneficial for me and my future classroom, because of how frequently I will could be using this type of equipment. Unlike my high school experience with cords and microphones, I want to be able to demonstrate and teach my students how to properly take care of our equipment, so it’ll last for a long time, and we can overall appreciate the music we get to make with them!

http://www.theblackandblue.com/2011/06/20/wrap-cable-over-under/

Whitney